East german makarov

The FN M1922 pistol was a modified M1910 Browning.  The barrel was lengthened and an extension put on the end of the slide to bring it to the same length.  In addition the grip was extended to accommodate a longer magazine holding 9 rounds of .32 acp instead of the 7 used in the M1910.  After the German invasion around 3200 sets of parts were found in the FN plant that were in .380 acp.  These were finished by the Germans & issued with acceptance stamps.  The parts for the .32 acp version were used up and new production undertaken.  By September, 1944, about 363,000 M1922 pistols were accepted by the German military.

Poland , Hungary , and Czechoslovakia have developed their own handgun designs chambering the 9×18mm round. Hungary developed the FEG PA-63 , Poland the P-64 and the P-83 Wanad and Czechoslovakia the . While similar in operation (straight blowback), and chambered for the same round, these 9 mm Makarov firing pistols are often found labeled at gun shows by some US gun retailers as "Polish Makarovs" and "Hungarian Makarovs". Nonetheless, these cosmetically similar designs are independent of the PM and have more in common with the Walther PP (which, in fact, was also a major influence on the original Russian Makarov [10] ).

In 1995 then production of the mini-series starting with serial # 000001 began. The left of the slide was marked "SIMSON SUHL/THUR" (with Umlaut - the two dots - on the "U" in "THUR") and the right is marked with a blacksmith symbol and "MAKAROV 9x18mm". There appears to be some variation on this, since the pistols with serial numbers in the mid-400s and the ones in the 700s only say "SIMSON SUHL" without the "THUR." (see pictures below) Considering that the original production run was only scheduled to yield approximately 300 pistols and that serial numbers in the 700s are now being sold, it is conceivable that full-scale production has been resumed.

Word To The Wise
Many of you reading this will be familiar with the Makarov as many have been imported to the ., especially the Bulgarian variants. But for those who have yet to shoot a Makarov, I’ll offer a few comments. First, the Makarov has a very heavy double-action pull, but the single-action pull isn’t too bad. Second, it has a bottom magazine release, which doesn’t really bother me that much. I’ve used them enough to know how to stick the spare mag between the fingers of my support hand and combine the operation of stripping the empty magazine and inserting a fresh one. Third, the lanyard ring is a good feature on a military or police pistol, but I can attest to the fact that it digs into one’s side when thrusting a Makarov into the trousers in the crossdraw position. Fourth, the safety/hammer drop is counterintuitive for those of us who are used to Walther PPKs. The safety must be in the down position to chamber a round. Once the round is chambered, pushing the safety up drops the hammer and locks the slide closed. The pistol may be carried this way and the safety thrust down before pulling the double-action trigger. Or it may be carried with the safety down, ready for a double-action pull. I normally used the second method. The sights are adequate. Is the Makarov a great combat pistol? Well, you’ll have to define great. It has certainly seen decades of use with some hard-core Russian military and police. As for me, it’s one of my favorite “modern” military pistols. That’s partially because I grew up during the Cold War when the Makarov’s were scarce—I wanted one. I think I also like it because I had a professional interest for many years in Soviet special operations capability. Whatever the reason, I like my Makarov. Speaking of which, I think it’s due for a field trip the next time I go shooting. ★

On October 8, 2013, a joint Task Force 141/Delta Force operation codenamed Operation Kingfish was launched; the team consisting of John Price , John "Soap" MacTavish, Simon "Ghost" Riley , Gary "Roach" Sanderson , and Delta Operators Sandman and Derek "Frost" Westbrook . The team assault the main compound and are able to recover some intel, but get ambushed by a bomb, forcing the team to evacuate. During the evac Soap is wounded by an RPG and is partially knocked out, an AC-130 tries to defend the team as they sprint toward their evac point, but is shot down. Leaving the team completely vulnerable. Forcing Price to selflessly stay behind to facilitate the team's escape. Roach and Sandman drag Soap aboard an Osprey, much to his dismay. In the aftermath, Soap is assigned as the task force's field commander.

East german makarov

east german makarov

Word To The Wise
Many of you reading this will be familiar with the Makarov as many have been imported to the ., especially the Bulgarian variants. But for those who have yet to shoot a Makarov, I’ll offer a few comments. First, the Makarov has a very heavy double-action pull, but the single-action pull isn’t too bad. Second, it has a bottom magazine release, which doesn’t really bother me that much. I’ve used them enough to know how to stick the spare mag between the fingers of my support hand and combine the operation of stripping the empty magazine and inserting a fresh one. Third, the lanyard ring is a good feature on a military or police pistol, but I can attest to the fact that it digs into one’s side when thrusting a Makarov into the trousers in the crossdraw position. Fourth, the safety/hammer drop is counterintuitive for those of us who are used to Walther PPKs. The safety must be in the down position to chamber a round. Once the round is chambered, pushing the safety up drops the hammer and locks the slide closed. The pistol may be carried this way and the safety thrust down before pulling the double-action trigger. Or it may be carried with the safety down, ready for a double-action pull. I normally used the second method. The sights are adequate. Is the Makarov a great combat pistol? Well, you’ll have to define great. It has certainly seen decades of use with some hard-core Russian military and police. As for me, it’s one of my favorite “modern” military pistols. That’s partially because I grew up during the Cold War when the Makarov’s were scarce—I wanted one. I think I also like it because I had a professional interest for many years in Soviet special operations capability. Whatever the reason, I like my Makarov. Speaking of which, I think it’s due for a field trip the next time I go shooting. ★

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