Medical use of steroids in sports

In addition to the mentioned side effects several others have been reported. In both males and females acne are frequently reported, as well as hypertrophy of sebaceous glands, increased tallow excretion, hair loss, and alopecia. There is some evidence that anabolic steroid abuse may affect the immune system, leading to a decreased effectiveness of the defense system. Steroid use decreases the glucose tolerance, while there is an increase in insulin resistance. These changes mimic Type II diabetes. These changes seem to be reversible after abstention from the drugs.

Anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) withdrawal is established to be an important, though poorly known medical problem, because of AAS potency to cause physical and psychological dependence. Thus discontinuation of high-dose, long-term anabolic steroid use, apart from endocrine dysfunction (hypogonadotropic hypogonadism), may lead to development of withdrawal symptoms. They include mood disorders (with suicidal depression as the most life-threatening complication), insomnia, anorexia, decreased libido, fatigue, headache, muscle and joint pain, and desire to take more steroids. The withdrawal from anabolic steroids usually requires treatment. Clinical management, as with other drugs of abuse, consists of supportive therapy and pharmacotherapy. The goals of treatment are to restore endocrine (hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal, HPG) function and to alleviate withdrawal symptoms. The endocrine medications that are targeted specifically to ameliorate HPG function include testosterone esters, human chorionic gonadotropin, synthetic analogues of gonadotropin-releasing hormone and antiestrogens. They are indicated in the presence of persistent clinical symptoms or/and laboratory evidence of HPG dysfunction. Other medications, that are targeted to provide symptomatic relief include antidepressants (especially serotonin selective re-uptake inhibitors), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and clonidine. Notwithstanding, it should be remembered that many of the above mentioned drugs have their own potential for abuse or side-effects, so their use must be carefully weighted and optimal treatment strategies for AAS withdrawal must await further clinical research.

AAS just like any drug, prescribed or otherwise, can have various effects on each person individually. Yes all of these side effects and more are POSSIBLE, but that doesn't mean they will happen. Which means the people who commented that the guy who wrote this is ignorant are wrong, and the people who said that they hoped it wasn't too late for their kid are wrong. The fact is is that you can see any commercial for any drug on television these days and the side effects are in the hundreds, usually ending in death, and this only applies to a limited number of people. The only truly ignorant statement about AAS would be the myth of roid rage. There was one guy who commented who seemed to have a lot of experience, and I agreed with him on this point. Roid Rage is a myth. However, if you take AAS then happy people are not necessarily happy people, sad sad, angry angry, etc etc. AAS are hormones. If it is not closely regulated you are going to have mood swings, and emotions that you wouldn't normally feel. Just like a woman on her period, pregnancy or menopause (what do you think those are anyway?) when a man OR a woman messes with their hormones, especially with something synthetic, it is going to affect your body and mind. Also, I agree with whoever wrote about doctors not knowing what they are doing. “Doctors are men who prescribe medicines of which they know little, to cure diseases of which they know less, in human beings of whom they know nothing.” Voltaire

Medical use of steroids in sports

medical use of steroids in sports

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